Category Archives: Computing

Where to Blog? Consolidate!

In this blogging age (well, I might be a late bloomer) I have long anguished over where to keep my journal of the random thoughts that I have spread across several blogs. There are two conflicting issues that has driven my anguish:

  1. If anyone is following me on any of my blogs, then I do not want bore them with too much off-topic content.
  2. It is a pain to remember where to post what.

But, it turns out that I don’t blog consistently on any one topic—I’m kind of A.D.D. that way—and I don’t think anyone but my mom is reading this, anyway. I blog as an outlet to practice writing (your redlines happily accepted); with the practical side-effect of using the cloud to back up my memories. So, I have decided to consolidate. My future ramblings involving my sphere of interests will all happen here (except the startup/entrepreneurship and programming topics that I post on Cache Crew blog). Since I am using WordPress (blogging software), I can organize my interests by category and use tags to index postings. We will see how well this allows me keep the content organized, easy to follow, and simple to find. I plan to move the content from all my other personal blogs here as well, so I can find them all in one place. Continue reading Where to Blog? Consolidate!

“Unhack” Your Facebook Account

If you are lounging around at a café, Facebooking using their public wifi, note that a hacker with the right software can grab your login information and do you the favor of Facebooking for you, without your help. Realistically, his kind of hack is not very prolific, but it is easy to block, so it’s better to be safe than sorry. Since Facebook makes this simple setting unduly difficult, the following is a quick step-by-step (as of July 4, 2011).

  1. Go to the “Account” drop-down menu in the upper right of your Facebook page.
    Facebook Account Continue reading “Unhack” Your Facebook Account

Gmail “Anonymizer”: Using Gmail without others knowing about it

Free email is always popular. With Gmail having been out for a while and all those nifty Google services which require a Gmail ID as a prerequisite, Gmail is more popular than ever. Couple with that its great Spam filtering and it’s no wonder why so many people use it. Even if you have your own domain or other email mailbox, the Spam protection, alone, might be a reason to switch to Gmail. Other reasons: almost unlimited mailbox size, fast searching of all your email, a single place to organize all your email, a single view to your mail organization from any email client (via IMAP), and versatile mail management via labels.

So, if you are going to use Gmail, here’s some advice on how to use it right. Continue reading Gmail “Anonymizer”: Using Gmail without others knowing about it

Protect Home Networks from Bad Websites

Here is a quick way to configure your home network to filter access to all those bad websites. This can help to keep inadvertent clicks to mal-ware websites from causing havoc with machines connected to your network—even the machines that belong to guest that are just visiting. At the same time, you can filter access to websites that some in the household should not be visiting.

Here is the short story: set the router that connects your home network to the internet so that its DNS primary and secondary IP addresses to 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220. Continue reading Protect Home Networks from Bad Websites

Retrieving from Old Backups (.bkf) with Windows 7

Okay, I know you have never used the Windows backup tool in Windows versions prior to Windows 7, so this article is not of any use to you. Windows 7 uses an entirely new scheme for storing backups and, out of the box, is not able to read the older backup files. (This might apply to Windows Vista, as well).

Just like VHS tapes and floppy diskettes, backup files that were created with prior versions of Windows are going by the wayside and are not usable, by default, under Windows 7. Fortunately, Microsoft has made a utility available for Windows 7 that can retrieve files from those old backup-files. First, you will need to get Microsoft’s program from Windows NT Backup Restore Utility for Windows 7. Continue reading Retrieving from Old Backups (.bkf) with Windows 7

VMware: Running Your Apps Safely in a Virtual Environment

As a software/techy/geek, I love VMware Workstation for Windows (and Linux and Fusion for OSX). These products allow an operating system to run within the context of the operating system—a computer within a computer, so to speak. This allows a single machine to be used to run any applications without having to to use multiple machines, dual-boot, or reinstall applications. Continue reading VMware: Running Your Apps Safely in a Virtual Environment